Gamers Make Better Doctors

Though you can’t exactly get a Ph.D in playing with the Nintendo Wii, new evidence suggests that experience with video games might just help young people become more skilled in professional fields like medicine and science.

If someone in your family spends hours sitting around the house playing World of Warcraft or rocking out to Guitar Hero, don’t despair: Though you can’t exactly get a Ph.D in playing with the Nintendo Wii, new evidence suggests that experience with video games might just help young people become more skilled in professional fields like medicine and science.

Several recent studies have compared the skills of surgeons who spend their downtime playing video games to those who don’t, to find out who’s best with a scalpel. As it turns out, all those hours with a console pad seem to pay off: Of 33 surgeons studied, the ones who played video games were 27 percent faster during operations, and 37 percent less likely to make errors, than the non-gamers.

“The single best predictor of their skills is how much they had played video games in the past and how much they played now. Those were better predictors of surgical skills than years of training and number of surgeries performed,” Douglas Gentile, one of the researchers, told the Associated Press. “So the first question you might ask your surgeon is how many of these (surgeries) have you done and the second question is ‘Are you a gamer?’”

comments powered by Disqus